The Linux Foundation, a non-profit organization promoting the adoption of Linux and Open Source software among enterprises and professionals, announced that the OpenSwitch project is now officially a Linux Foundation project.

Last year in October, the Hewlett-Packard Enterprise Development team was proud to introduce the world to its OpenSwitch NOS (Network Operating System) initiative, attempting to offer the open source community a full-featured, Linux-based network operating system.

Powered by the Linux kernel, HP’s OpenSwitch network operating system is based on the latest GNU/Linux technologies and designed from the ground up to act as a community-based platform powering enterprise-grade switches. The OpenSwitch project is dedicated to bypass vendor lock-in and accelerate open source innovation.

“OpenSwitch brings another important ingredient of the open networking stack to The Linux Foundation,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation. “We’re looking forward to working with this community to advance networking across the enterprise.”

The perfect solution for building data center networks

Being a full-featured Network Operating System (NOS), OpenSwitch was engineered as the perfect solution for developers and sysadmins looking for an easy way to build data center networks tweaked for business apps. OpenSwitch enables organizations

Multiple hardware vendors and organizations have joined forces to advance the development of the enterprise-grade network operating system, including big names like LinkedIn, Broadcom, Marvell, Mellanox Technologies, Barefoot Networks, Quattro Networks, and, of course, Hewlett-Packard Enterprise.

To get started with OpenSwitch today, please visit the project’s website, where you can find all the documentation you need to install the network operating system on your hardware. OpenSwitch comes with a full-featured L2/L3 control plane stack from SnapRoute, as well as a traditional, declarative and programmatic control plane.

By design, OpenSwitch is fully interoperable with some of the major enterprise-scale open source technologies, including, but not limited to, OpenStack and Ansible. Furthermore, it can be easily integrated with OpenVSwitch, LLDPD, Quagga, Broadcom Broadview, P4, and Grommit open source technologies.

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