On May 15, 2016, Linus Torvalds announced the final release of the Linux 4.6 kernel, which introduces a significant number of new features and improvements over previous releases.

Prominent features of Linux kernel 4.6 include the OrangeFS distributed file system, support for the B.A.T.M.A.N. (Better Approach To Mobile Adhoc Networking) V networking protocol, an online inode checker for the OCFS2 file system, support for Intel Memory protection keys, support for the pNFS SCSI layout, as well as support for the USB 3.1 SuperSpeed Plus (SSP) protocol.

Of course, the Linux 4.6 kernel also introduced dma-buf, a new ioctl that was designed from the ground up to manage cache coherency between GPUs and CPUs, and Kernel Connection Multiplexor, a new component engineered to accelerate the application layer protocols. Support for cgroup namespaces and 802.1AE MAC-level encryption (MACsec) are also present in the Linux kernel 4.6.

Collabora contributed 42 patches to Linux kernel 4.6

Linux kernel and Collabora developer Gustavo Padovan talks in his latest blog post about the contributions made by the Collabora developers in the new Linux 4.6 kernel release. According to Mr. Padovan, a total of nine Collabora engineers contributed to the development of Linux kernel 4.6, implementing no less than 42 patches.

“As part of Collabora’s continued commitment to further increase its participation to the Linux Kernel, Collabora is actively looking to expand its team of core software engineers,” said Gustavo Padovan in the blog announcement, where he also lists some of the most important patches that have been contributed to Linux kernel 4.6 by various Collabora devs.

The adoption of the Linux 4.6 kernel amongst GNU/Linux operating systems is slowly starting to grow, and we’ve already reported on the fact that Arch Linux, Gentoo, Debian Testing, and SparkyLinux users can now download the latest and most advanced kernel version for their distributions. The Linux kernel 4.6 sources are available for download as well via our website or from kernel.org.

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